Showing posts with label slavery. Show all posts
Showing posts with label slavery. Show all posts

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Top 10 Current YA Tropes that Will Make Me NOT Want to Read a Book

I've done a couple variations of this post over the years, but it's definitely time for more up-to-date refresher for Top Ten Tuesday.

Examining Racism - Without POC.
I don't know where this trend started, but I absolutely deeply, deeply dislike any book that uses fictional races (elves, dragons, werewolves etc.) instead of people of color and tries to make them oppressed to illustrate how bad racism is.
(Spoiler alert: Anyone who isn't white knows this already. You don't have to teach us, oh my god.) Even worse when it's written by a white author who lacks the nuance and skill to execute this well.

The Alpha Male Douchebag.
I hate them. I've always hated them. The love interests who are bulky, muscly, super attractive and absolute shitheads to their girlfriends. I DNF anything with that instantly, I have no time for this. Knock knock! It's 1950, it wants their mentality back.

Voiceless, shy, and "bland" heroine.
I think all readers of YA are collectively tired of this. If I read about another girl that's bland with brown hair, brown eyes, and no personality, but yet thinks she's not like other girls? Well, I'm literally going to throw that book into my fireplace. No time for this.

In a world where the rich green-blooded people oppress the lower class because of their purple blood and inferior silver eyes and golden hair...
There are approximately 327836273 books about this. I am SO over this overdone and unimaginative premise of rich superior genetics people versus poor inferior (but still conventionally attractive) genetics people. Even worse when one of the poor ones manages to infiltrate the higher ups and it actually turns out they're also green-blooded/have ominous super powers/have an inexplicable asset they need. I just described probably 40% of the latest high fantasy releases. Please stop.

A girl with inexplicable powers and two boys who love her - one good and innocent, and one evil and mysterious. Who will she choose?
At this point nobody will take any book seriously that makes use of this. It's so overdone, it's not even funny anymore. And it's also really annoying that you always know that she's going to choose the bad boy every single time. I'm not bitter or anything.

Contemporary m/f romances that have no other premise than "he was a boy, she was a girl".
Compulsory heteronormativity is real and I'm not letting it on my shelves. I don't pick up any contemporary romance at all unless it goes more into the contemporary direction than the romance direction and has a super unique premise. If it's f/f or otherwise LGBTQ*, all bets are off though, I'm buying anything you have.

Whitewashing.
Don't think we don't notice and we don't see you. We see you whitewashing common and well-known mythology and cultures. We see you. Stop it.

One girl, destined for greatness by the ancient prophecy, rises up to lead a rebellion...
How has nobody deleted this trope completely yet? I can't see it anymore. I want to see no more teenage rebellions. Please god no. Who'd follow a teenager into war anyway? Maybe I'm just outgrowing this trope, I don't know if actual teenagers still enjoy this. I'm feeling old.

Fictional Oppression or Slavery.
You guys know how I feel about this, so yeah, no need to repeat it. Thanks, but no thanks.

Problematic Comparison Titles.
If it says for fans of [insert any known super ableist/racist/homophobic book], I am out. This is actually a really great method that has proved to be always pretty successful. Weed out the weak by watching what books get compared to. Will save you a lot of time.



What are some tropes that make you not want to read a book?


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Thursday, January 12, 2017

[Review] Nemesis (#1) - Anna Banks: Egyptians and Slaves

In NEMESIS, element forger and princess Sepora flees from her home kingdom of Serubel only to end up enslaved to her nemesis Tarik, the new king of Theoria.

What intrigued me: Not the cover, that's for sure. I came solely for the enemies to lovers trope.



CAUTION: NEMESIS is a book about slavery. The fact that the blurb uses "servitude" instead of slavery (probably in an attempt to sugarcoat) is simply appalling. Google indentured servitude. There's a difference.

Cultural Appropriation and Whitewashing

NEMESIS is pretty much a "how not to" guide for white authors looking to write books inspired by a culture that is not their own. It's fairly obvious that Banks neither used sensitivity readers nor did any research that went deeper than surface level. Learn from her mistakes:

NEMESIS draws heavily from Egyptian and Jewish history and culture. And with "draws from", I mean appropriates. Complete with white savior protagonist Sepora, who starts out as a slave and easily works her way up to becoming a close advisor of the king, mostly because she's so beautiful and unique. This isn't an homage / rewrite / whatever you want to call it. There are no people of color in this book. And no, "olive skin" does not count as a stand-in for brown or black. Since this book so heavily draws from these peoples history, the least it can do is not whitewash them.

NEMESIS doesn't commit and doesn't have the guts to make this an unapologetically African or even African-inspired story and therefore can only be called cultural appropriation. You can't take the existing history of marginalized people, take the bits you like, make it all butterflies and unicorns, and paint it all white to top it off. I have major problems with the way Banks portrays the Theorians, who are very clearly fictionalized brown/black Egyptians. While Banks does not portray them bluntly like savages, thankfully, her portrayal is full of racist micro aggressions. 

From calling their language, which very clearly is an allegory to East African languages, primitive, and generally making fun of their traditions, ridiculing pretty much every Egyptian-inspired and -coded tradition they have as redundant and ridiculous as seen through King Tarik's eyes - NEMESIS is incredibly offensive on so many levels. If King Tarik's POV represents how Banks sees people of color, I am absolutely speechless.  NEMESIS is not written for people of color. It really feels like an attack, as an African, to see an author draw very obvious inspiration from an African country but to dismiss pretty much every aspect of their culture that makes them what they are. I cannot speak for Banks' portrayal of the Serubel (faux-Jewish) people and I won't, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's just as bad.

It's not very flattering either that white Sepora's arch enemy is the "olive-skinned" (speak: faux-black) Tarik, king of Theoria. It's absolutely not a good idea to insinuate brown/black vs. white conflict without committing to it. This isn't a book about race, so this allusion doesn't belong here. Banks has no business writing about this in the first place.

...and look at all that wasted potential.

I was immediately impressed with the winged serpents and element-forging protagonist in NEMESIS. And Banks also has these interesting two POVs that really complement each other. 

While I'm not necessarily a fan of the writing, which is a little too simple, info-dumpy, and clunky for my personal taste, protagonists Tarik and Sepora's alternate storylines are surely interesting. Sepora's story consists of a lot of wandering around and reckless info-dumps which easily and quickly annoyed me, and Tarik's story packs a punch from the start, beginning with his father dying of a mysterious illness. 

NEMESIS could have been SO good. Exceptional, unapologetic, and big. This book could've been huge if it was only starring a diverse cast and if Banks had bothered to hire sensitivity readers, which she c l e a r l y did not. I generally do not want to read anything about slavery in a book that doesn't tackle race.
  • And I don't know, I don't understand in what world it is okay to pretend that all of these people were white. 
  • And I also don't know in what world writing a romance between a master and a slave without even doing as much as just mentioning the word slavery, and not approaching this topic with the sensitvity and respect it deserves, is okay. 
  • And I also don't know why it seems to be so hard to have the basic decency to hire a sensitivity reader if you're going to write about a culture that isn't your own. 



Rating:

★☆☆☆

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

NEMESIS blatantly whitewashes and culturally appropriates the history of Egyptian and Jewish peoples in the form of a fantasy rivalry between the fictional kingdoms of Serubel and Theoria. This book is about slavery while whitewashing it and using it as a plot device, which for me is absolutely a no-go, especially coming from a white author. And of course this features an obligatory master/slave romance. Don't let the blurb fool you, nobody is a "servant" in this book. It's slavery.

  • Note - even more problems: 
I have a major problem with the cover. I understand that painting their skin is a thing that Sepora's people do. But it just awkwardly seems like one step removed from blackface to me. Maybe that's far-fetched, I'm well-aware that people of color didn't invent painting their skin and don't own this, but considering that this is a practice commonly associated with the indigenous peoples of some Pacific Islands, some African countries, or New Zealand, it leaves a bitter taste in my mouth. 

If Sepora was a person of color I wouldn't even have to mention this. I don't understand why she had to be white. I know many people who were put off by this cover -specifically- because it shows a white person with full body paint in one color and decided not to read this book or anything else by this author. Which I absolutely understand knowing that the content of the book matches the cover.

[HEY JEWISH OR EGYPTIAN REVIEWERS - have you reviewed this book? I'd be happy to link your reviews here, just shoot me an email or comment or whatever!]


Additional Info

Published: October 5th 2016
Pages: 368
Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
Genre: YA / High Fantasy
ISBN: 9781250070173

Synopsis:
"Princess Sepora of Serubel is the last Forger in all the five kingdoms. The spectorium she creates provides energy for all, but now her father has found a way to weaponize it, and his intentions to incite war force her to flee his grasp. She escapes across enemy lines into the kingdom of Theoria, but her plans to hide are thwarted when she is captured and placed in the young king’s servitude.

Tarik has just taken over rulership of Theoria, and must now face a new plague sweeping through his kingdom and killing his citizens. The last thing he needs is a troublesome servant vying for his attention. But Mistress Sepora will not be ignored. When the two finally meet face-to-face, they form an unlikely bond that complicates life in ways neither of them could have imagined.

Sepora's gift may be able to save Tarik’s kingdom. But should she risk exposing herself and her growing feelings for her nemesis?"
(Source: Goodreads)


So... that was exhausting. Tell me something nice? Maybe about an #ownvoices book that has good representation of people of color?

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