Showing posts with label problematic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label problematic. Show all posts

Sunday, February 19, 2017

White Authors Who Write about Slavery | YA Talk




Due to harassment and lack of allyship this educational post has been removed. Why?

More on problematicness:
Should We Separate Authors from Their Problematic Work? 
Do We Owe it to Authors to Call Out Problematic Books Nicely?
What is POC rep to you? "Olive Skin", On the Page, and Non-#Ownvoices Authors 
All YA Talk posts

BEFORE YOU COMMENT -
I don't want to hear about white authors who did it well or answer your question about your slavery book. Please listen. I'm trying to make you understand.

For personalized advice on writing diversely and recognizing problematicness, check my Patreon.
If you want to support The Bookavid and posts like this, feel free to buy me a virtual coffee via ko-fi.

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Saturday, January 14, 2017

8 Blogging Resolutions for 2017 - Things I Vow to Do, and You Should, Too | Book Blogging Tips (#47)

Resolutions are a tricky thing. I usually don't really care for them because they hardly ever are things that I think I can realistically achieve. 

But looking at the development my blog has gone through since launch in september 2014, I noticed that I very much am able to fulfill bookish ones - and that doing this absolutely changes my blog for the better.

Call this a blogging hacks post if you will, disguised as a new year's resolution.


#8: I vow to read more out of my comfort zone.
Doing that is sometimes hard, I get it. But by picking up books you normally wouldn't have, you can sometimes find gems. Would you believe that one of my favorite books ever, LIFE'S THAT WAY by Jim Beaver was one of these? I don't do Non-Fiction, usually. Makes me uncomfortable and I don't really care. But trust me, sometimes it's worth taking a chance on books you're skeptic about.

#7: I vow to read genres I usually dislike. 
If you've been following me for a long time you know that I don't like high fantasy. Never have. But looking at my blog statistics, it's the most reviewed genre. Why? I want to educate myself. Read stuff I don't usually read. Sometimes you can find new favorites like that. This year's genre is Historical Fiction + Historical Fantasy. I'm hoping to make it the most reviewed genre on my blog by 2018.

#6: I vow to give popular books a shot.
You know I'm a hipster when it comes to reading - I don't like reading what's popular and that's not really a desirable characteristic. I'll try to read more popular books in 2017 and push myself.

#5: I vow to read even more diverse books than non-diverse ones.
My reading habits changed for the better since I consciously picked up more diverse books. Just trust me on this one, especially if you have a marginalization, may that be a mental illness, disability, or being a person of color - reading about people like you makes your life better. And even if you aren't marginalized - expand your horizon. It's fun.

#4: I vow to not bother with books that I don't enjoy.
I DNF left and right and you should, too. Don't bother with books that are a chore to go through. Your time is too precious.

#3: I vow to boost the heck out of my reviews of problematic books.
This is a very important thing to do. I know, it feels scary to speak up sometimes, but know that you're protecting marginalized readers, especially teens, by doing that. Sharing is caring.

#2: I vow to stand with bloggers and reviewers who are getting attacked for speaking up.
This goes with the previous point - as much as it is important to speak up about problematic representation, it's also important to protect the people that are doing the talking. We need to have their back, no matter the cost.

#1: I vow to keep on improving, keep on changing.
I think that's the beauty of blogging. That you can look back at all your old content and smile because it reminds you of the person you were when you posted it. Blogging styles change and post formats and ideas and all that do, too. That's a beautiful thing. I hope I'll get some more of that blogging nostalgia looking back at this post a couple years from now.


What are your resolutions blogging-wise for 2017?




More Book Blogging Tips:

Dramatic Changes I Made that Ended Up Improving My Blog
No Comments on Book Reviews?
How Often Should You Post per Week?
Are You Awkward About Getting Review Requests from Authors?

8 Tips to Get Motivated to Write Blog Posts
More Generous Ratings for Indie Books?


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Tuesday, August 11, 2015

I Fall For Problematic Love Interests | YA Talk




I may not be the only one 

Usually I try very hard to be the voice of reason. But I also have a lot weaknesses when it comes to YA. The second we've got a sexy villain love interest entering the room, I'm suddenly unable to think properly.

After asking some of my friends in the reading community I noticed that all the male favorite characters are usually people that you wouldn't want to meet in real life - especially not in a dark corner.



Top Five Favorite Male Character Answers I got:

- Warner from Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi
- The Darkling from The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo
- Travis Maddox from Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuire
- Patch from Hush Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick
- Jace Wayland from The Mortal Instruments series by Cassandra Clare

I haven't read all of these books, but I certainly noticed that there's a trend towards male villains.


Why are the bad boys so appealing?

  • Confidence
A thing that plays a major role when determining whether you find somebody attractive, is their confidence. When you present yourself well, you're more likely to succeed. 

  • "I do what I want"- attitude
I guess it's also a sense of maturity that radiates from men who know what they want and don't hesitate to for it, no matter the cost. They put themselves first to achieve their goals and that's probably what we all should do - of course within legal bounds. I'm not saying you should build an army of robots and invade your professor's house because he failed you in a class.

  • Danger!
With bad boys, you're bound to make more memorable experiences than with the nice guy next door. If the YA heroines stuck in a love triangle between the good guy and the leader of an illegal rebellion against a totalitarian regime, you already know who she's going to choose. 

We read books because we want to experience new things. We want to see the world the way never could in real life.

So hell yeah I'm going to root for the heroine to choose that guy who robs banks for a living over her childhood best friend! I don't care if he's a mass-murdering insane greedy villain, as long as he doesn't torture puppies.

I'm not ashamed to say that I'm absolutely 100% a problematic villain fangirl. Are you?


Who are your problematic favorites?


Come back next Tuesday for a new YA Talk! 

More YA Talks:


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