Showing posts with label goodreads reviewing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label goodreads reviewing. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

When is it Okay to Talk About Sequel Spoilers? | Book Blogging Etiquette (#10)



Don't you just love getting your favorite book series spoiled? 

Fortunately this hasn't happened to me in a while but I'm very much not looking forward to this happening anytime soon.







Be gentle on your readers- especially on social media.

Whenever I'm talking about a sequel I always assume that someone out there who has an eye on my social media is still planning to read the first one. Even if that book came out in, say, 2005. There is no expiration date on reading and if something isn't so popular that it's pretty much general pop culture knowledge by now (for example Darth Vader being Luke Skywalker's father), you really shouldn't ruin someone's day by talking about spoilers without labeling them. Anywhere.

The thing is, I try to be as inclusive with my blog as I possibly can. I want backlist and frontlist readers to have a great time here, I want to provide as much of a variety in terms of the books that I review and the content I provide as I can. Same goes for my social media. It's only logical then to also take into consideration that there will be readers out there who are planning on reading the first book to sequel you're talking about.

Very often I hear from people who read my blog that my review made them interested in reading a specific book. And that often happens with sequels, too. I like to think that the people who read my blog also care about my opinion on things and that I to some degree am able to influence their decision whether to read a book or not. And blatantly spoilering left and right on social media and blog, knowing that there are possible readers and fans of a series or book I've already read out there is just a no no.

You're ruining everyone's online experience by doing that. Especially when we're talking about social media where you can't mark spoilers appropriately and by default end up spoilering someone if you talk about it openly.

What about reviews?

Of course, sequel reviews are completely out of the picture here. If you're purposely clicking on a review of a sequel, that's your own fault for getting spoilered. I personally find that it's nearly impossible to write a high quality review for a sequel without spoiling anything about the first book. I'm usually still trying to keep the worst spoilers to myself if no necessary, but usually it's fair game to spoil in sequel reviews in my opinion.

(It should go without saying that unlabeled spoilers have no business in a review of a standalone or first in a series, by the way, that's why I'm not even addressing this. NEVER do this.)

So how do I prevent this whole mess?

Simple. By labeling your spoilers. Don't be a meanie and mark your spoilers.



What's the last book that somebody spoiled for you?




More Book Blogging Etiquette:


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Thursday, March 30, 2017

Mean Horror Book Reviews and Learning to Review Properly | YA Talk

I've been recently diving more into YA horror and noticed a pattern - no matter who wrote it, you'll see that ALL horror books have very low ratings and the most upvoted reviews are exclusively negative. 

If you're active over there you might also know that books usually have 4+ star ratings unless they're exceptionally horrendous or offensive (well, not always...). 


So I'm asking - why do we hate horror?

Seriously. I think this might be a reason why YA horror isn't taking off as a genre. I'm seeing reviewers give books one star ratings because they didn't scare them shitless, give books extremely negative ratings simply because they play into a cliche - you'll find the most unnecessary reasons over there. Of course, everyone is entitled to their opinion, entitled to writing a scalding review, but it's fairly obvious that reviewers and bloggers are extra mean when it comes to horror. 

I get it, horror is an extremely subjective genre. Of course not everything will scare you, of course not everything will work out for you - but I feel like a huge part of learning how to review is to learn to appreciate craft and calm down a little about your own preferences. Just because a book didn't work for you you don't have to rate it one star. That's a rookie mistake. You have so much impact on authors' careers and doing that is almost always a bad idea. 

The problem with this behavior is that this is probably one of the leading reasons why there is so little horror on the market in the first place. Bad reviews, no recommendations, scalding comments from reviewers - all that leads to less sales, less buzz, and people being less interested in reading those books in the first place. I constantly hear people say they want more YA horror, I see bloggers and reviewers alike complain about the lack of horror - but then turn around to give every single horror book they read a scalding review because it wasn't the right kind for them. Again, I'm not saying you can't review horror books negatively. But this systematic pattern of being mean about horror books is such a frustrating thing to see for anyone who truly enjoys YA horror.

Keep in mind that the world doesn't revolve around you.

I've rated books I personally disliked and could hardly finish five stars before because they are extremely important books by marginalized writers about marginalized teens that have no representation on the market. It's incredibly important that you review with the thought in mind whether SOME of your readers might enjoy the book. That's just an example - I can't wrap my head around this that it seems like everyone is being extra harsh about all horror books on the market. And don't get me started on diverse horror books. Their ratings are even worse! You can't tell me that this is a coincidence.

I don't know, you guys. This just makes me sad. 

Contrary to popular belief, reviewing is a very difficult thing that demands a lot of responsibility and maturity. Seeing horror author after horror author have their book tanked because it didn't work for some people personally is just disheartening to see. I want more YA horror. I'm happy to read as many horror books as I can. But I don't know if we'll even get any more if this behavior continues.



Do you like YA Horror? What's your favorite read? Let's talk YA.



More on reviewing: 

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Thursday, January 14, 2016

Why You Should Never Ever Take Review Inspiration From Goodreads | Book Blogging Tips (#34)




As a blogger, you probably also have a Goodreads account. Goodreads is a community where you can share reviews, book recommendations, and the like with your friends and discuss the latest books you read.

A huge part of the website is the review section. Anyone and everyone can publish reviews, sharing their opinion with the whole world. 

There are absolutely no rules, and this is exactly why the worst thing an aspiring blogger can do, is to copy-and-paste their super popular Goodreads reviews onto a blog.



The Difference Between Reviewing on Goodreads and Independently

Most reviews on Goodreads are angry rants. The more you write about why you hate a book, the more likes you're going to get from similar-minded people. While I'm a-ok with expressing a negative opinion, it always always always depends on the tone. On Goodreads, people can vote on your review. The more likes and comments it has, the more likely it is to get around and be seen by a lot of people. Logically, the reviews that are shared a lot are the ones that polarize. 

Consequentially - what do people do when they want to get famous on Goodreads? Write controversial reviews, mostly involving swear words, GIFs, quotes, and anything to support your negative or positive opinion. 

If you're reviewing on a blog, your focus isn't on the looks of the review, but the content. At least it should be. Of course you're supposed to have a certain common theme and aesthetic to your reviews, but it's all about your opinion.
On Goodreads, it's all about attention, getting comments and likes, and ideally also ridiculing the author. 

Why Goodreads-Reviewing Is Terrible 

On Goodreads you won't only find a lot readers, but also authors.
Many popular and famous authors do have a Goodreads account, so there's a chance that they'll read what you have written. Most popular Goodreads Reviewers don't have independent blogs and strictly stick to the website. But I've seen a few people try to transition with those hate-filled and flat out mean reviews you'll find on the site.

If you don't know what I mean by goodreads-reviewing, here's a review from a very popular Goodreads reviewer for Becoming Jinn by Lori Goldstein


[Source]


Imagine being the author and having to read that your book made someone want to gouge their eyes out. So much work from a copious amount of people goes into writing a book. If you're going to review it, don't do it like this. It's insanely disrespectful, childish, and mean.

As an aspiring blogger, I can just urge you to aim for the highest level of professionalism you can, while staying true to yourself. Don't look at Goodreads and try to write your reviews like the popular people on there. 


What's Your Opinion on Goodreads-

Reviewing?


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