Showing posts with label aliens. Show all posts
Showing posts with label aliens. Show all posts

Thursday, May 25, 2017

[Review] Waking Gods (Themis Files #2) - Sylvain Neuvel: Aliens and Giant Robots

In WAKING GODS, another space robot has randomly landed on Earth and Rose has mysteriously returned from the dead.

What intrigued me: Really loved the first book, SLEEPING GIANTS.

No Protagonists?

I was so excited for WAKING GODS after really being obsessed with SLEEPING GIANTS. Unfortunately, the sequel couldn't even come to get me even remotely as excited. It uses the exact same premise and format, interview snippets, random POVs from throwaway characters and all of that. Ultimately, I think that's the reason why I disliked this so much. For a fast-paced standalone, it definitely can work to have everything focus on the plot more than the characters, but for a series? How am I supposed to care for anything that's happening when there's not even remotely a connection to the characters? 

There are virtually no protagonists in this series, if there were any, they'd be Rose, Kara, and Vincent, whose story lines don't play much of a role until a good 60% into the novel (by which I was already asleep and didn't care for anything anymore). This is definitely the biggest weakness of the series - as fantastically plotted and inventive as it is, I just won't give a damn if there's no way to connect to the characters. This is a me thing though and highly subjective, so you might feel completely differently.

So, I Guess this is the Apocalypse...?

Another huge problem I had is that I never felt the urgency or the seriousness of the situation. In SLEEPING GIANTS, a lot of the plot is spent in a secluded area and in WAKING GODS, suddenly it's 10 years later and everybody knows about the giant robot Themis and I was just completely lost. Maybe it's because it's been about 6+ months since I read the first book, but I just couldn't get into this. I couldn't bring myself to care - WAKING GODS is supposed to be exactly like SLEEPING GIANTS but with more action, danger, and urgency, cause the aliens are arriving! I just didn't feel it. The format also contributes to making me feel completely disconnected from the story, the whole world, actually, and I just longed to simply stick with the characters that we've already gotten to know in the first book. I really did my best to give this a couple shots, but ultimately ended up skimming a chunk of this. I just didn't care. Sigh. 

I feel like WAKING GODS had to do a lot differently than SLEEPING GIANTS in order to be a success, but because it didn't, I'm through with this series and I have zero interest in continuing it. Unfortunately.


Rating:

★★☆☆

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

WAKING GODS is a huge disappointment that failed for me because I was hoping for it to be set up differently and to focus more on the characters than doing this whole über conspiracy thing again and working way too much with diary entries and interview snippets. I also physically couldn't care less that this is supposed to tell the story of an epic battle between humanity and aliens - I was busy zoning out.



Additional Info

Published: June 13th 2017
Pages: 416
Publisher: Heyne
Genre: Adult / Sci-Fi / Aliens
ISBN: 9783453534803

Synopsis:
"As a child, Rose Franklin made an astonishing discovery: a giant metallic hand, buried deep within the earth. As an adult, she’s dedicated her brilliant scientific career to solving the mystery that began that fateful day: Why was a titanic robot of unknown origin buried in pieces around the world? Years of investigation have produced intriguing answers—and even more perplexing questions. But the truth is closer than ever before when a second robot, more massive than the first, materializes and lashes out with deadly force.

Now humankind faces a nightmare invasion scenario made real, as more colossal machines touch down across the globe. But Rose and her team at the Earth Defense Corps refuse to surrender. They can turn the tide if they can unlock the last secrets of an advanced alien technology. The greatest weapon humanity wields is knowledge in a do-or-die battle to inherit the Earth . . . and maybe even the stars."
(Source: Goodreads)

What's your favorite book about aliens?



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Thursday, April 27, 2017

[Review] We Are the Ants - Shaun David Hutchinson: Alien Abductions and the Apocalypse





In WE ARE THE ANTS, Henry is frequently abducted by aliens and presented with the choice to either prevent the apocalypse or let the world end.


What intrigued me:
 Alien abductions and the world is ending? Count me in!

... is that it?

WE ARE THE ANTS has a fantastic premise and an equally great narrative voice. Hutchinson absolutely had me from the first page, the cynic and observant way he writes Henry is incredibly entertaining and fun. However, all this can't mask the fact that there really isn't much to WE ARE THE ANTS aside from the premise. 

All characters in this are painfully obvious plot devices. The main problem I had with everyone in this book that Henry doesn't show any attachments whatsoever to the people surrounding him. How is the reader going to be enamored with the characters if they are all introduced like worthless scum bags? Henry's cynicism may be entertaining for the first 100 pages, but it quickly gets insanely tiring. 

Getting abducted? What else is new...

Another problem I had is that Hutchinson romanticizes depression. Protagonist Henry get depressed very early on when he realizes that the world's fate is in his hands and I just don't like the way this gets handled. The whole atmosphere just screams "your typical depressed kid from a broken home finds love and gets cured", and that's exactly what you're getting in WE ARE THE ANTS. The story has so much potential, but I think Hutchinson absolutely ruined everything that lured me to this story with the execution. 

Especially the abduction part is written so frustratingly boring that I can't wrap my head around it. Henry doesn't theorize about it much, or appears scared or worried about it! The only emotion he displays is annoyance, which seems to be pretty much his default.

WE ARE THE ANTS is nothing short from being a regular novel about a kid's high school troubles. The alien part is so redundant that this doesn't even feel like Sci-Fi. Absolutely a disappointment.


Rating:

★★½☆☆

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

WE ARE THE ANTS is just an average contemporary with a side of aliens. If you like that, and aren't expecting too much world building or fantastic characters, go ahead!



Additional Info

Published: 19th January 2016
Pages: 455
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Genre: Sci-Fi / Aliens
ISBN: 9781481449632

Synopsis:
"There are a few things Henry Denton knows, and a few things he doesn’t.

Henry knows that his mom is struggling to keep the family together, and coping by chain-smoking cigarettes. He knows that his older brother is a college dropout with a pregnant girlfriend. He knows that he is slowly losing his grandmother to Alzheimer’s. And he knows that his boyfriend committed suicide last year.

What Henry doesn’t know is why the aliens chose to abduct him when he was thirteen, and he doesn’t know why they continue to steal him from his bed and take him aboard their ship. He doesn’t know why the world is going to end or why the aliens have offered him the opportunity to avert the impending disaster by pressing a big red button. 

But they have. And they’ve only given him 144 days to make up his mind.

The question is whether Henry thinks the world is worth saving. That is, until he meets Diego Vega, an artist with a secret past who forces Henry to question his beliefs, his place in the universe, and whether any of it really matters. But before Henry can save the world, he’s got to figure out how to save himself, and the aliens haven’t given him a button for that."(Source: Goodreads)


Do you like books about alien abductions?

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Monday, April 17, 2017

Top 10 Things That Will Make Me Want to Read a Book Instantly

Today you'll learn a bit about my favorite tropes, little things, genres - anything that I enjoy and will make me pick up a book instantly.

#1: f/f!
I'm so predictable. There is unfortunately so little representation for sapphic girls in YA, that I gotta take what I can get. I pretty much buy anything if it has girl-loving girls.

#2: Paranormal Horror!
You'd think there'd be more horror YA books out there. But unfortauntely it's very hard to find something that isn't gore-y, actually scary, and doesn't use mental illness as a poorly-researched premise. I also definitely can't stand crime-related horror with murderers or kidnappers or whatever. If it's paranormal and spooky, I'm in. But please, no ghost romances.

#3: Magical Realism!
Again, you'd think there'd be more. Magical Realism is a genre that most books on  the market claim to be, but if you actually pick it up it usually turns out to be Urban Fantasy. I've learned that it's best to stick with Latinx authors.

#4: Parallel Universes!
You guys know I love anything involving parallel universes. Generally you can hook me with anything that has multiple dimensions in them.

#5: Travelling to Space!
I love love love when authors write about space and introduce wacky world building that you'd never see anywhere but in space. Unfortauntely very few authors put the emphasis on the world when writing Science Fiction, so I'm stuck with trial and error.

#6: Aliens, Aliens, Aliens!
I have no idea how I developed this tendency, but I'm such a sucker for good old paranormal romance with aliens. I gobble these books up. Actual romance in space is hardly ever my thing, but if it's a weird alien coming to Earth, disguising themselves, and falling in love with a human? Sign me the heck up!

#7: Time Travel!
Another instant buy. I love a well-executed time travel book. It's very hard to get that right, I think time travel is one of the hardest things to execute well and to still have it make sense. My utmost respect to all authors who try. I love a good angsty high-concept time travel romance.

#8: Mixed format!
This is one of my newest obsessions. Any book that has a semi-intriguing premise AND features multiple formats (texts, chat logs, newspaper articles etc.), is definitely something I'll have to buy and have to own a physical copy of. No clue why, but I really enjoy the variation.

#9: My marginalizations!
I think this is a thing that gets everyone hooked. I've got a couple different marginalizations and having just a little bit of my identity represented automatically gets a buy. Oddly enough, while I do like identitiy representation I want any book set in a country I've lived in to be as physically far away from me as possible. Really deeply hate those for some reason.

#10: #Ownvoices!
Honestly? I dread reading non-#ownvoices and I try to avoid it. You guys know I read a lot (like, seriously A LOT) and from experience I know that most non-#ownvoices books are absolutely terrible. Either they're riddled with offensive, problematic content or just completely poorly written. Is this a thing or do I just pick up the worst books unintentionally? Every time I read an ownvoices book, it turns out to be a five star read. Odd. Let's investigate this.


What are some things that will make you pick up a book instantly?


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Monday, January 30, 2017

[Review] Magonia (#1) - Maria Dahvana Headley: Bird Humans and Ableism





In MAGONIA, Aza has a chronic lung disease and suddenly hallucinates (or not?) a ship in the sky.

What intrigued me: Chronic illness and magical realism! Sign me up!


Strange narration and no structure

MAGONIA immediately surprised me with an incredibly unique voice. Aza's narration is very reminiscent of a stream-of-consciousness. It's hard to keep up with the plot, with her thoughts, with everything really, because there is hardly any indication of scene changes. I struggled a lot with the narration, even though it is undoubtedly very memorable and unique. 

MAGONIA uses the justification "it's magical realism, I don't have to explain anything" way too much. It desperately lacks descriptions to even begin to create images in the reader's head. This book can't hide that it has no structure whatsoever, doesn't make sense, and is absolutely weird. The weird thing isn't necessarily something negative, but it isn't a good kind of weird. I had no idea what was happening half of the time, and struggled to even understand the scenes because of the strange narration. It's really a novel that you have to pay attention to very closely to even be able to keep up, and I find that extremely unappealing and not very entertaining at all. 

Disabled people are not your plot device. Stop.

The problem with this book is that it starts out with a fantastic chronically-ill character and instead of celebrating the character's disability - decides to cure them. Could we just not do this generally. [highlight for spoiler]
  Yeah, I get it, she dies and ascends to another plane of existence and then it all makes sense why she was disabled in life because she's secretly a superhuman bird humanoid. Can we just not.
[end of spoiler]

What's the point in writing about disability if you magically cure it halfway in? Imagine how chronically-ill people feel when reading this book. Why couldn't Ava remain sick? This would've made for such a powerful read and I would've celebrated the crap out of this!

Even though MAGONIA technically doesn't deserve such a low rating because of the sheer skill, creativity, and unique voice, I am not supporting this behavior. Don't cure disabled characters for your plot, in fact don't even write about disabled characters at all if you only think it would make for an edgy blurb and brownie points! Just because it's fiction, you aren't allowed to write whatever you want, especially not if it involves marginalized people. Disabled people are not your plot device. Don't write about them if you just think it'll make for a good pitch.

Well, I should've known from the blurb. Describing chronically-ill people as "weak and dying thing[s]". NEXT!

Rating:

☆☆

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

Absolutely not, I would even go as far as to actively advise against reading it because it's so incredibly, incredibly insensitive. MAGONIA lures with an interesting idea, but is absolutely ruined through its insensitivity and ignorant ableist message. So, at what point do real-life chronically ill people get invited to Magonia so everything will be rainbows and butterflies again?



Additional Info

Published: April 28th 2015
Pages: 309
Publisher: HarperCollins
Genre: YA / Magical Realism
ISBN: 9780062320520

Synopsis:
"Aza Ray is drowning in thin air. 

Since she was a baby, Aza has suffered from a mysterious lung disease that makes it ever harder for her to breathe, to speak—to live. 

So when Aza catches a glimpse of a ship in the sky, her family chalks it up to a cruel side effect of her medication. But Aza doesn't think this is a hallucination. She can hear someone on the ship calling her name.

Only her best friend, Jason, listens. Jason, who’s always been there. Jason, for whom she might have more-than-friendly feelings. But before Aza can consider that thrilling idea, something goes terribly wrong. Aza is lost to our world—and found, by another. Magonia. 

Above the clouds, in a land of trading ships, Aza is not the weak and dying thing she was. In Magonia, she can breathe for the first time. Better, she has immense power—and as she navigates her new life, she discovers that war is coming. Magonia and Earth are on the cusp of a reckoning. And in Aza’s hands lies the fate of the whole of humanity—including the boy who loves her. Where do her loyalties lie?(Source: Goodreads)


Have you read MAGONIA?

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Saturday, December 3, 2016

[Review] Other Systems (#1) - Elizabeth Guizzetti: Aliens and Human Colonies | #ReadIndie





In OTHER SYSTEMS, future humans are coming back to Earth because their colonies can't survive without human DNA much longer.

What intrigued me: I love everything related to aliens!

What's happening?

The initial idea is absolutely brilliant, I was very excited about reading this. However, OTHER SYSTEMS really, really lacks in execution. 
The story is told from the POV of Abby, a girl that is taken to Kipos, the future human colony's home planet, and Cole, a space traveler. I especially struggled with Cole's POV because just didn't understand what was going on. 

There are so many specific terms in this that are hardly explained, it took me too long to even understand what the different kinds of humans are and what happened to Earth. I can safely say that I spent the first 150 pages being absolutely confused and not really knowing what was happening. You'll definitely need to be invested and/or don't mind about not really understanding all details to finish this. I feel like there are different stories in this, three books tried to be told in a single volume. Resulting from this, OTHER SYSTEMS seems very chaotic and difficult to read.

Fascinating idea, but too very complicated

Even though it is difficult to read, the idea is just too fascinating to toss OTHER SYSTEMS aside and give up. I absolutely love novels about humans going to space, even more so when everything has already taken place and the humans are going back! The world building truly is impeccable and there is a lot to explore. I would have liked this a lot more, had I been given the opportunity to actually have those elements all explained instead of just getting bombarded with information.

Generally, OTHER SYSTEMS really would have benefited from being told from one person's POV. Abby's chapters are significantly easier to read and it does feel like you're actually reading a YA novel. With Cole's POV thrown in, the book just gains a strange dynamic, again, it's just multiple stories fused into one. 


Rating:

★★

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

OTHER SYSTEMS displays a magnificently built, fascinating world, but simply makes the mistake to leave out explanations. It portrays an interesting possible human future that is truly fun to explore.



What's #ReadIndie?



Additional Info

Published: 10th April 2013
Pages: 532
Publisher: 48Fourteen
Genre: YA / Sci-Fi / Space & Other Planets
ISBN: 9781937546144

Synopsis:
"Without an influx of human DNA, the utopian colony on Kipos has eleven generations before it reaches failure. Earth is over ninety light years away. Time is short. 

On the over-crowded Earth, many see opportunity in Kipos's need. After medical, intelligence, and physiological testing, Abby and her younger siblings, Jin and Orchid, are offered transportation. Along with 750,000 other strong immigrants, they leave the safety of their family with the expectation of good jobs and the opportunity for higher education. 
While the Earthlings travel to the new planet in stasis, the Kiposi, terrified the savages will taint their paradise, pass a series of indenture and adoption laws in order to assimilate them. When Abby wakes up on Kipos, Jin cannot be found. Orchid is ripped from her arms as Abby is sold to a dull-eyed man with a sterilized wife. Indentured to breed, she is drugged and systematically coerced. 

To survive, Abby learns the differences in culture and language using the only thing that is truly hers on this new world: her analytical mind. In order to escape her captors, she joins a planetary survey team where she will discover yet another way of life.(Source: Goodreads)

What's your favorite book about aliens?

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Thursday, October 13, 2016

Recommendation: Alienated (#1) - Melissa Landers: Student Exchange and Aliens





In ALIENATED, Cara is participating in the first alien exchange program and is hosting student Aelyx from the planet L'eihr.

What intrigued me: I love alien YA so much.

Hilarious and original

ALIENATED really looks and sounds like your average paranormal romance. I was expecting something similar to Jennifer L. Armentrout's OBSIDIAN, but was surprised to find that Landers took a completely different spin on the topic. 

ALIENATED is a flat-out hilarious and super entertaining YA that focuses more on two cultures clashing than the romance. Essentially the L'eihr are sexy Vulcans. There's just no other way to put it. It sounds strange, but ultimately works fantastically in the context of the book. They have no understanding of human customs, emotions, etc. and it's just funny. ALIENATED proves to be a fun, light-hearted read all around and I thoroughly enjoyed it a lot. The pages flew by!

Flawless Dual POV and Organic Romance

Landers has an incredibly strong character voice for human Cara and alien Aelyx and makes it so fun to follow the story. Despite being told from two POVs, which is usually one of my pet peeves, Landers absolutely makes the most of it and actually makes this a reason why I enjoyed ALIENATED so much. Their voices are drastically different, they both have different objectives and plot lines that they're following in the party they narrate. Especially Aelyx's POV is so interesting because Landers truly gives him an alien way to look at the world and it's so entertaining. 

Another highlight is the relationship between the two. It's swoon-worthy in the least, bordering on the epic. Because Landers takes so much time with it and lets it develop naturally and slowly, it feels absolutely organic and realistic. There's no instant love or superficiality, these two truly develop feelings for each other in a manner that feels real and with a dash of humor all of that is even more fun to read about. ALIENATED is a fantastic read, spiked with swoony romance and humor, it's the light-hearted delight you'll love when you're in the mood for some extraterrestial romance.



Rating:

★★

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

ALIENATED is a fun, light-hearted read that you'll love if you like paranormal romance with a side of humor. A clear recommendation and I cannot wait to get my hands on the sequel and read more about Cara and Aelyx.



Additional Info

Published: Feburary 4th 2014
Pages: 344
Publisher: Disney Hyperion
Genre: YA / Sci-Fi / Aliens
ISBN: 9781423170280

Synopsis:
"Two years ago, the aliens made contact. Now Cara Sweeney is going to be sharing a bathroom with one of them. 

Handpicked to host the first-ever L’eihr exchange student, Cara thinks her future is set. Not only does she get a free ride to her dream college, she’ll have inside information about the mysterious L’eihrs that every journalist would kill for. Cara’s blog following is about to skyrocket.

Still, Cara isn’t sure what to think when she meets Aelyx. Humans and L’eihrs have nearly identical DNA, but cold, infuriatingly brilliant Aelyx couldn’t seem more alien. She’s certain about one thing, though: no human boy is this good-looking.

But when Cara's classmates get swept up by anti-L'eihr paranoia, Midtown High School suddenly isn't safe anymore. Threatening notes appear in Cara's locker, and a police officer has to escort her and Aelyx to class. 

Cara finds support in the last person she expected. She realizes that Aelyx isn’t just her only friend; she's fallen hard for him. But Aelyx has been hiding the truth about the purpose of his exchange, and its potentially deadly consequences. Soon Cara will be in for the fight of her life—not just for herself and the boy she loves, but for the future of her planet."(Source: Goodreads)


What's your favorite alien read?

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Saturday, October 1, 2016

[Review] Sleeping Giants (Themis Files #1) - Sylvain Neuvel: Giant Robots and Outer Space




In SLEEPING GIANTS, a little girl finds an enormous robot hand made of metal in the woods and the military immediately grows interested in it.

What intrigued me: The tagline they used in promotion got me. World War Z meets THE MARTIAN? Um yeah, get on my shelf ASAP.

Perfect transitional read for people who don't like Sci-Fi

SLEEPING GIANTS is told through interview snippets and diary entries from multiple characters. All in some way connect to a mysterious man who is secretly in control of the operation to get the robot to work.  Most of it is actually dialogue, which I loved. 

It makes this way easier to read and hides the fact that this is a pretty heavy Sci-fi thriller with political elements. Especially for people like me who shy away from epic Sci-fi or political thrillers, this could serve as a nice transitional read to get more into the genre.

I definitely struggled a little with the tone of the novel. Most of the plot is told from the perspective of military officials and scientists who use highbrow language and complex scientific processes to explain things. Even though Neuvel tries to simplify all concepts and processes, I found myself zoning out whenever someone started talking about chemical elements. This is very minor though, because the story about the ancient robot hand will eventually suck you in and force you to keep on reading until your eyes burn. It happened to me. At some point the story just starts to become so gripping and you get so invested that it's almost impossible to put it down. 

Enchanting and thrilling

I was surprised to grow attached to the characters and their fate. Neuvel manages to paint multi-faceted character relationships by telling the majority of the interactions in retrospective. If two characters who aren't the mysterious interviewer and another character interact, it's always told after it happened and through the eyes of one of the people who were there. 

You'd think that format would get tiring after a while but it really doesn't. I'm so glad Neuvel wrote this almost exclusively in dialogue, because I'm sure I would've zoned out or even quit the novel altogether if that story was told in a classic way. Like this it's easy, it's handy, it fits the plot. I enjoyed this a lot and found myself unable to predict any of the twists, which is really rare. SLEEPING GIANTS is a very unique, almost experimental read that will surprise and enchant you.


Rating:

★★★★

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

Following the events in SLEEPING GIANTS almost became an addiction. It's really impossible to put down and a fantastic thriller that you should read if you like conspiracies and aliens. It put me in the worst reading slump ever because it's so genius!



Additional Info

Published: August 8th 2016
Pages: 416
Publisher: Heyne
Genre: Sci- Fi / Aliens
ISBN: 9783453316904

Synopsis:
"A girl named Rose is riding her new bike near her home in Deadwood, South Dakota, when she falls through the earth. She wakes up at the bottom of a square hole, its walls glowing with intricate carvings. But the firemen who come to save her peer down upon something even stranger: a little girl in the palm of a giant metal hand.

Seventeen years later, the mystery of the bizarre artifact remains unsolved—its origins, architects, and purpose unknown. Its carbon dating defies belief; military reports are redacted; theories are floated, then rejected.

But some can never stop searching for answers.

Rose Franklin is now a highly trained physicist leading a top secret team to crack the hand’s code. And along with her colleagues, she is being interviewed by a nameless interrogator whose power and purview are as enigmatic as the provenance of the relic. What’s clear is that Rose and her compatriots are on the edge of unraveling history’s most perplexing discovery—and figuring out what it portends for humanity. But once the pieces of the puzzle are in place, will the result prove to be an instrument of lasting peace or a weapon of mass destruction?"(Source: Goodreads)


Have you read SLEEPING GIANTS?

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Saturday, July 9, 2016

Recommendation: Alive (Generations #1) - Scott Sigler: Dystopian Prison World and Suspense


In ALIVE, a girl wakes up alive in a coffin with no recollection of who she and why she was put in there. 

What intrigued me:
 Sounds like a YA version of Matrix. I love conspiracy theories. Absolutely a synopsis-buy.


This novel will mess with you

The less you know about it, the better. In order not to spoil the experience for anyone, I'll be very vague when talking about this book, because ALIVE strives from the cluelessness of the reader. After Em wakes up in coffin you know just as little as her about this world. You figure out everything with her and that's what kept me glued to the pages. It's such a simple way of encouraging the reader and getting them invested in the story, and it's absolutely works.

Sigler brilliantly manages to channel this feeling of not knowing what's going on through the protagonist Em and it's just fabulous. You won't know what's going on until it's happening, and I guarantee you the resolution will leave you gasping and yelling. If you love plot twists and mind games, this is the novel for you.

As someone who is not inherently very into most Dystopian YA on the market, this is really refreshing because it doesn't play into the stereotypes we've all read about a gazillion times before. ALIVE is truly very unique, very interesting, and very strange. 


That's how you write a leader!

I usually don't like typical leader-like characters, especially in YA. Often these people come across as awkward and not really fit for the job, but Em is among the best strong protagonists I've ever read about. The choices she has to make along the way are realistic, full of sacrifices, and just made her such a likeable and wonderfully real character.
I absolutely enjoyed the way Em navigates through the story, however, I wished at some point that the story progressed a little more quickly, simply because I was so desperate to find out what was going on. There is a lot of walking around in this and after a while it does get exhausting to read all these scenes, even though Sigler did his best to make them as enjoyable as possible. Technically, this isn't even criticism, just me being impatient.

The twist truly made me want to buy the second book instantly and read more about this interesting world. Despite it all taking too much time for my taste to unravel, it was truly a great read and I enjoyed this immensely. If you're a fan of being kept in the dark until the end and then having your world shattered into a million pieces by a wonderfully grim twist, this is the read for you.


Rating:

★★★★

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

If you're not a fan of the genre usually, give this one a try. Don't read any reviews, just get the book and trust me. It'll be worth it. 



Additional Info

Published: July 14th 2015
Pages: 368
Publisher: Del Rey
Genre: YA / Dystopian

Synopsis:
"A young woman awakes trapped in an enclosed space. She has no idea who she is or how she got there. With only her instincts to guide her, she escapes her own confinement—and finds she’s not alone. She frees the others in the room and leads them into a corridor filled with the remains of a war long past. The farther these survivors travel, the worse are the horrors they confront. And as they slowly come to understand what this prison is, they realize that the worst and strangest possibilities they could have imagined don’t even come close to the truth."
(Source: Goodreads)

What's your favorite Dystopian read?

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Tuesday, November 17, 2015

[Recommendation] The 5th Wave (#1) - Rick Yancey


 In THE 5th WAVE, aliens are invading the earth. In four surges they have already murdered the majority of the earth's population.

Teenager Cassie is one of the sole survivors, preparing for the fifth surge of the alien invasion.

I'm not sure what happened here and how it happened but this is definitely my favorite read of the year. And it's November, so that says a lot. This was my first audio book in a long time, and I'm very, very happy I chose this one.



Prose to die for

Yancey manages to write the most relatable teen girl protagonist I have encountered in YA so far. Cassie's voice is just essentially teen, her thoughts, her feelings. I can't imagine how a fifty year old man managed to pull that off. I'm honestly truly, truly impressed.
I especially enjoyed the first chapter, which is essentially a monologue, but with a truckload of depth. Cassie's feelings about the invasion are described so powerfully and so movingly that I couldn't even do anything else while I listened to the audio book. I was absolutely sucked into this strange world.

Usually I groan when authors don't jump right into the story, but Yancey is inexplicably talented at info-dumping the heck out of the reader and still leave you yearning for more. The premise, the alien invasion, is just executed masterfully. Yancey doesn't give much information about it in the first place, but sprinkles the info-dumps all over the first chapters, so you find yourself yelling at the audio book narrator to hurry up / frantically turning the pages (whichever format you prefer).

There's only one cliché in this book. And it's my pet peeve...

The only things I didn't like as much about the book relate to the (of course we have one) love triangle. I really don't like them. I'm sorry.
Yancey made it a little more bearable by setting the whole thing up from the start. Cassie's infatuation with this boy Ben from her school is mentioned very early in and I understand and it does make sense, but love triangles are just a red flag for me. I'm sorry, other authors ruined this for me.

It just doesn't seem realistic for Cassie's super crush to have survived all of this, when a huge portion of humanity died. I'm surprised that Yancey went for this, because he's so realistic in his writing everywhere else. The invasion isn't sugarcoated, it's just WAR. Blunt, ruthless war without compromises. There are more plot twists that I can count, but then Yancey goes for the most persistent and arguably annoying cliché in dystopian YA: the love triangle between the MC, the crush/ old friend, and the rebel. Man. But seriously, this is the only thing I don't like about this book.

...

On audio narration:
I listened to the German audio book from Der Hörverlag Audible, which is narrated by Merete Brettschneider, Achim Buch, and Philipp Baltus as the protagonist Cassie and her love interests respectively.  Because I loved the book so much, it wasn't a smart choice to listen to the audio book - the narration speed is much slower than my own reading speed. Mainly because I'm an insanely fast reader when I love a book. Brettschneider uses pauses frequently for emphasis, which does work in terms of narration, but I just wanted to binge-listen the whole thing. I wish there had been an option to speed the whole book up a little. 

However, the character voices are so, so, so spot on. You hardly find a narrator that can pull off male AND female voices flawlessly. Brettschneider sounds believable as a 16 year-old teen just as much as a 40-something Dad. It's a little terrifying how good she is, actually. I didn't even notice it's the same person talking. This sounds strange, but she really is that good at sounding like men. I'm in awe. She could have single-handedly narrated the whole audio book alone.

Rating:

★★★★ 


Overall: Do I Recommend?

I'm an alien enthusiast and I have read more alien books than I can count. BUT: This is by far my favorite.
It's written so relatably, so believably, and the world building is amazing. "The 5th Wave" reads like mixture of "The Reapers are the Angels" and "The Host". Just more ruthless and realistic. If an alien invasion is ever going to happen in my life time, this is how it's going down. "The 5th Wave" should be compulsory reading for all YA alien stories fan. Nevermind me while I run to the next book store to pick up a physical copy of this as well.



Additional Info


Published: April 14th 2014 
Pages: 496
Genre: YA / Sci-Fi / Aliens
ASIN: B00JAD6RPU

Synopsis:
"After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it's the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth's last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie's only hope for rescuing her brother--or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.(Source: Goodreads)



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